Habitat Restoration

Wildlife habitat has been fragmented and degraded over the last several decades, in part from development and changes

Bob Long, Wild Turkey and Upland Game Bird Project Manager with Maryland DNR - Wildlife and Heritage Service talks with participants about Northern Bobwhite.

Bob Long, Wild Turkey and Upland Game Bird Project Manager with
Maryland DNR – Wildlife and Heritage Service talks with participants about Northern Bobwhite.

in farming practices. Invasive species have choked out native plant species, further reducing available habitat for many pollinators and wildlife.

Grass and forested buffers along rivers, streams and agricultural ditches are critical management practices to help reduce chemicals, nutrients and sediment from impacting our waterways. Our conservation easements require buffers along waterways and many farmers and other landowners can implement these best management practices through available cost share programs. These practices benefit not only our waterways but improve habitat for much of our wildlife.

Pollinator conservation resources are available from USDA under the 2014 Farm Bill. Click on the link to see if technical support and cost share programs are right for you.

Northern Bobwhite, a once iconic bird in Maryland, has seen populations decreased to unprecedented levels. Experts point to the E.A. Vaughn Wildlife Management Area and surrounding lands as having some of the highest populations, but restoration of hedgerows and habitat must be improved in order for the quail to survive on the lower shore.